The 31-credit MA program in Chinese Economy is composed of the following courses, plus the MA thesis:


Spring Semester

 

COMPULSORY

COURSES

CONTENTS

Chinese Economy

Finance

China's Financial System
Yin Xingmin, Professor

PhD, University of Essex
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

Overview of China’s financial system, the banking and intermediation sector, understanding China’s interest rates, central banking and the conduct of monetary policy, money and inflation, financial intermediation and credit policy in economic development, the interaction between monetary and fiscal policies, the money markets, the capital markets, the mortgage markets, debate on RMB exchange rate policy, commercial banking industry, banking regulation, securities and investment funds, and financial system and economic performance.

Macroeconomics
Ge Jinfeng, Assistant Professor

PhD, Stockholm University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

The level of this course is intermediate macroeconomics. Macroeconomists are interested to know how far the standard model can explain consumption, investment, unemployment, business cycle, economic growth, money demand ... A bit stretched perhaps, policy implications can be obtained based on relevant frameworks. In the end of the course, students are supposed to know how to solve basic models, and how to map from theory to reality.

Money and Banking

Ye Haichun, Associate Professor

PhD, University of Oklahoma 

Credits: 3

Credit Hours: 48

The course studies the role that money, interest rates, and financial intermediaries play in the operation of the macro-economy. Therefore, the aim of the course is to give students an overview of the financial markets and an understanding of the theory and practice of monetary policy. The topics will be a blend of theoretical modeling and empirical/historical discourses.

 

OPTIONAL

COURSES

CONTENTS

Monographic Study on Chinese Finance
Shen Guobing, Professor

PhD, Zhejiang University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

This course is aimed to enable students to grasp the basic knowledge introduction to Chinese finance, and apply core advanced economic theory and quantitative methods to the issues of Chinese finance, through lecture learning, literature reading and case thinking.

Environmental and Energy Economics: Approaches and Applications in China
Wu Libo, Professor

PhD, Hiroshima University
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

This course aims at delivering comprehensive economic interpretations on the policy mechanisms of environmental and natural resource management. Since policy instruments for environmental and natural Resource management is deeply rooted in economics but also informed by perspectives drawn from political, legal, ecological, and psychological research, this course will involve equity and political thinking.

Applied Econometrics
Chen Shiyi, Professor

PhD, Kyungpook National University
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

This course is designed to be a user-friendly approach to practical econometric analysis for advanced undergraduate students or master students. This is meant to be an applied course, though, I will be using significant amounts of mathematical notation throughout the lectures. Basic familiarity with elementary calculus and statistics is required. Matrix algebra would be helpful.

China's Reform and Opening-up
Zhang Yan, Associate Professor

PhD, Peking University
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

Why has Chinese economy grown so fast? Where will Chinese economy go? As a major participant in the world economy, China’s economic future is important to investors, households, and governments. This course tries to give some explanations to so-called China's Miracle, and more importantly, to discuss current top issues and directions of future opening-up and reform.

World Economy and China 
Lu Hanyin, Associate Professor

PhD, Fudan University
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

This course examines the implications of China's emergence as a major player in the world economy. Its integration into the global economy brings major effects for the rest of the world. China's participation in the world economy also offers important opportunities for trade, investment, and international cooperation to promote world prosperity and stability.

Industrial Organization
Zhou Yu, Assistant Professor

PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

The purpose of this course is to expose students to topics and techniques frequently discussed in Industrial Organization Literature. The first half will cover demand, supply, entry and matching. The second half will cover single-agent dynamics and market dynamics.

Development Economics
Xi Xican, Assistant Professor

PhD, Arizona State University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

The course covers some of the central issues in recent development economics literature and introduces a variety of methodological approaches to study these issues. It draws on a broad range of research papers and emphasizes particularly on their empirical methods. The goal of this course is to transform students into researchers who can conduct independent projects related to economic development.

Urbanization in China

Wang Zhi, Assistant Professor

PhD, Brown University

Credits: 3

Credit Hours: 48

The goal of this course is to give students an understanding of how to apply the latest thinking and research in economics to analyze a series of topics related to urbanization in China.

 

International Trade

Li Zhiyuan, Associate Professor

PhD, University of California, Davis

Credits: 3

Credit Hours: 48

The goals of the course are: (i) to introduce students to current topics of interest in international trade (ii) to help students develop skills for conducting research, including evaluating existing research, presenting their work, working collaboratively, and defining and organizing a research project, and (iii) to help students identify the topic for a research paper. In order to achieve these goals, we focus on the most cutting-edge research in international trade, with a bit introduction of necessary background classical theory. Different from traditional lectures, our class meetings require heavy discussions led by students which in turn require huge efforts from students to read, understand, organize and present.

Economics Growth and Innovation

Angus C. Chu, Professor

PhD, University of Michigan

Credits: 3

Credit Hours:48

This course will cover selected topics in economic growth and innovation. It will build on the macroeconomics curriculum by developing some formal models of economic growth. The course will give students a firm appreciation of modern developments in the theory of economic growth and of the strengths and limitations of these and older models.  Students will gain an understanding of a range of more complex influences on growth. Students will gain insights into a range of policy approaches governments might take to improve growth.

Dissertation Writing in Economics

Zhou Yu, Assistant Professor

PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

This course is designed to help the graduate students to make a transition from coursework to paper writing.

Note: In addition to the courses above, we have series of short-term courses named after Pro. Jiang Xuemo which are taught by the esteemed scholars from all over the world.

 

 

Fall Semester

 

COMPULSORY

COURSES

CONTENTS

Chinese Economy

Finance

Microeconomics
Xi Xican, Assistant Professor

PhD, Arizona State University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

Economics is the study of how society deals with the problem of allocation of scarce resources across competing uses. Every economic system must answer a few central questions, e.g. what goods to produce, how much of each good to produce, how to produce them, who gets the goods, etc.

Chinese Economy
Li Dan, Associate Professor

PhD, Boston University
Credit: 3
Credit Hours: 48

This course is a special course on Chinese economy. The course is designed to let students understand the great changes in China in the past thirty years through its economic reforms and opening to the outside world, and China’s fast economic development.
The course is divided into three parts. Part one provides a general introduction to Chinese economy from historical perspectives. Part two deals with the process of China’s economic reforms and opening process. The last part turns to issues in China’s economic development in the past thirty years.

 

Chinese Foreign Trade
Cheng Dazhong, Professor

PhD, Fudan University
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

This course is comprised of three sections. In Section I, we first introduce basic theories and approaches that are useful for analyzing Chinese foreign trade. Then we look back the long history of Chinese foreign trade and pay special attention to the regime reform of Chinese foreign trade since 1978 and China’s response to the latest developments in the global economic and trade institutions. Section II investigates Chinese foreign trade pattern, structure and performance in different settings including neoclassical framework, at the industry-level as well as the firm-level, and in the presence of “trade in tasks” or “trade in value added”. The final section discusses the implications of Chinese foreign trade development for China and the rest of the world.

 

China and Globalization

Liu Yu, Assistant Professor

PhD, Yale University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48 

This course studies the present status of Chinese firms and their global competitors in 14 selected industries. It draws on a broad range of news articles, policy reports, books, business cases, and academic research papers. Students will study the technologies and business strategies of the key players in these industries, with a focus on the foreign companies doing business in China and Chinese firms expanding overseas.

 

Corporate Finance

Xu Haibo, Assistant Professor

PhD, Washington University

Credits: 3

Credit Hour: 48

This is a master level course based on the text book “The Theory of Corporate Finance” by Jean Tirole. This course serves as an introduction to corporate finance and mainly focuses on the theoretical part, including topics related to credit rationing, borrowing capacity, passive and active monitoring, control rights, etc. To get a better understanding, the course requires some background training in intermediary microeconomics and introductory game theory/contract theory.

 

Quantitative Analysis of Financial Time Series

Fu Zhonghao, Assistant Professor

PhD, Cornell University

Credits: 3

Credit Hours: 48

This intermediate course of time series analysis focuses on the economic intuition and theoretical justification behind the econometric modeling of financial time series process. It starts with the basic concepts in time series analysis and the stylized facts of financial times series data and then covers the univariate and multivariate time series with topics including ARIMA models, volatility models, VAR models, factor models, forecasting time series, model selection, unit root, and structural changes. This course emphasizes the application of time series models in financial data.

 


OPTIONAL

COURSES

CONTENTS

Social Security System and Its Reform in China
Ding Chun, Professor

PhD, Fudan University
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

Through 'China's social security system and its reform' course open for foreign Master students, they can have an understanding of the basic concepts of the social security system, relevant theories and the bud, the formation, the question of reform and the trends of the social security system in the world. On this basis, the establishment, development, reform and reconstruction of Chinese urban and rural social security system are introduced since the founding of New China.

China's Taxation System and Fiscal Policy

Liu Yu, Assistant Professor

PhD, Yale University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

This course is designed to introduce China’s taxation system and fiscal policy. It will start with a brief description of the level of China’s tax revenue, China’s tax legislation system, tax collection and administration system and the taxes payable in China. Then the course will cover the rules of China’s major taxes. Various elements such as the scope, taxpayers, taxable items, rates and incentives of these taxes will be discussed. After that, we will recall the major measures taken in China’s last two rounds of tax reform and try to forecast the possible steps of future tax reform. In addition, we will discuss China’s budget system, intergovernmental fiscal relationship and the major fiscal policy measures and their effects.

Doing Business in China
He Xiyou, Associate Professor

PhD, Seoul National University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

Fast economic expansion, coupled with a rapid market transformation and a series of government reforms, China has become an increasingly attractive destination to do business. This course is designed to introduce some basic knowledge of Chinese culture, economy, legal system, market entry strategy which are essential to building a successful business in China.

International Finance
Hu Xu, Assistant Professor

PhD, Texas A&M University
Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48

This course studies issues such as the balance of payments, real and nominal exchange rate determination, and macroeconomic policy in open economies.

Foreign Direct Investment in Transition Economy
Luo Changyuan, Associate Professor PhD, Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

This course will explore the motivation and effects of FDI in host countries. The contents consist of two parts, namely general topics and special issues. As for the part of general topics, we will investigate FDI’s role in economic growth and technological progress. As for the part of special issues, we will focus on inward and outward FDI in China. In this part, the first 5 sessions will discuss facts and effects of inward FDI in China. The last session will turn to outward FDI in China.

Advanced Topics on Chinese Economy

Zhang Jun, Professor, Dean

PhD, Fudan University

And Other Guest Professors
Credits: 2
Credit Hours: 32

The objective of the course is to make students understand China's economic transition and development, focusing on the role of government as well as the markets. The course runs for sixteen weeks with sixteen topics in Fall semester and has two academic hours every week.

Labor Economics

Li Huailu, Assistant Professor

PhD, Boston University

Credits: 3

Credit Hours: 48

This course aims to provide a comprehensive overview on various labor economic topics and is designed to cover theories, empirical findings, as well as estimation methodologies. At the end of course, students are expected to have a firm grasp of fundamental models and its connections with government policy instruments.

Asset Pricing

Zhou Jing, Assistant Professor

PhD, Hongkong University of Science and Technology

Credits: 3
Credit Hours: 48 

This course provides introduction to modern asset pricing theory and aims to provide basic understanding the economically important issues on asset pricing. I start by presenting the empirical regularities and then turns on asset pricing theories in a progressive way. This course will help students to develop their critical thinking and tools for conducting their own researches, and will be useful for later advanced courses in Finance-related subjects.

Note: In addition to the courses above, we have series of short-term courses named after Pro. Jiang Xuemo which are taught by the esteemed scholars from all over the world.




EMA Courses (Chinese Economy), School of Economics
 

1st Semester

EMAE620001

Chinese Economy

Basic Degree

3

 Syllabus

EMAE620000

Basic Chinese (I)

Basic Degree

2

 Syllabus

EMAE620002

Microeconomics

Degree

3

 Syllabus

EMAE620014

China’s Taxation System and Fiscal Policy

Degree

3

 Syllabus

EMAE630004

Public Management in China

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630003

Academic Writing 

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630000

Industrial Policy of China

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630023

Advanced Topics on Chinese Economy 

Optional

2

 

Syllabus

2nd Semester

EMAE620006

Chinese Language and Culture

Basic Degree

3

 Syllabus

EMAE620004

Basic Chinese(II)

Basic Degree

2

 Syllabus

EMAE620005

Macroeconomics

Degree

3

 Syllabus

EMAE620015

China's Financial System

Degree

3

 

Syllabus

EMAE630006

Monographic Study on Chinese Finance

Optional

3

 Syllabus

EMAE630008

Political Economy in East Asia

Optional

2

Syllabus

 

EMAE630019

World Economy and China

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630005

China's Reform and Opening-Up

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630017

Applied Econometrics
 

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630016

Environmental and Energy Economics:
Approaches and Applications in China

Optional

2

 Syllabus

3rd Semester

EMAE620007

Doing Business in China

Degree

3

 Syllabus

EMAE630002

Chinese Foreign Trade

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630018

Social Security System and Its Reform in China

Optional

2

 Syllabus

EMAE630015

Capital Markets in China

Optional

2

 Syllabus